Stacey Blog

Indianapolis, born, bred and raised thriller author, Stacey Carroll is known for her unique perspectives on life and fiction. Influenced by Anne Rice, Stephen King and the Grimms Brothers, combined with the pure hatred of Disney endings, her novels are equally gritty and sexy with well-developed, realistic characters.

Additional influences on writing are her degrees. She has a Masters in HRD, a Bachelors in Aviation and a Computer science minor. All of these factors and her experience in flying Cessna 152s, 172s, King Airs and Piper Senecas have resulted in fiction novels that feature satisfying mature content emphasizing the characters.

Below are her rants, raves, curiosities and other writing tidbits that don’t fit anywhere else.

 

Are you considering being an independent fiction writer? There are many benefits of writing, editing, formatting and promoting your own fiction novels. The biggest benefit is that you are in complete control and do not have to answer to anyone else, except perhaps your readers and fans.

Understanding What It Is to Be an Independent Fiction Author

Being an independent fiction writer means that you are not represented by an agent, and you are not under contract with any publishing house. Instead, you’ve chosen to publish with Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Google Play and maybe even Apple Books. These platforms, especially Amazon, Kobo and Barnes and Noble, allow authors to publish directly with them in ebook and/or paperback formats. Google Play and Apple books are slightly harder to publish as an independent author as you have to wait for approval, which can take years with Google Play (I’m still waiting and I’d been about a year.). Apple books requires an Apple/Mac device in order to publish directly without the help of a third party.

1. No one is going to tell you what you can and cannot write.

If you’ve been researching the fiction writing industry for any length of time, you’ve probably ran across some websites, blog posts and articles that advise against writing certain genres and themes. A few of them that I’ve run across include vampires, unicorns, horror and erotica. What these websites and blog posts say is that these themes and genres are overdone, not interesting, too saturated to enter and readers aren’t interested in them.

In the case of erotica, it’s not that it’s too saturated or that it doesn’t make money. It’s that erotica is notoriously difficult to market. Putting erotica on your website also eliminates the ability to monetize your website with Google. Facebook and Twitter won’t let you boost a post that advertises an erotica book because it’s ‘offensive’. Amazon won’t even let you take out an ad for a book that’s listed under an adult topic, like erotica or erotic romance.

However, if you’re an independent fiction author who publishes under his or her own name, you can throw all this out, except for the knowledge that it’s incredibly difficult to advertise erotica. That’s a fact, and I can attest to it personally, but you’re not limited in what you can and cannot write. If you want to write a book about vampire monkey dogs on mars, you can write it. If you want to write a horror book where the monster is a rabid unicorn, no one is going to stop you from writing, editing, formatting and publishing that book.

 

2. You can publish completely for free.

The big bonus for independent fiction authors is that you don’t have to spend a dime in the creation of your book. You can write, edit, format and create your own cover and publish your book completely for free. In fact, Barnes and Noble, Kobo and Amazon all allow you to choose from various pre-created covers, which means you don’t even have to learn cover design if you don’t want to learn it, and they’ll provide you with site-specific ISBNs for your ebook and paperback books. Once you publish, however, they will take a percentage of your royalties, but you do not have to open your wallet to get your book on the site and available for sale.

3. You have the option to hire professionals

If you feel like you need a few professionals to help you and you have the money on hand without hurting your personal finances or blowing your monthly budget, you can professional editors, ebook and print book formatters and cover designers. The benefit here is that you can choose the professionals you’d like to work with after thoroughly vetting them. When you are traditionally published or working with a publishing house, you don’t get to choose your editors, formatters or cover designers. You are strictly limited to the ones used by the particular publishing house.

4. You choose how you want to market your books

Once your book is published, you can choose how you want to market your book. You can advertise on social media sites, like Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn. You can choose to advertise on paid and/or free book promotion sites, and you can take out Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Goodreads and Google ads. If you have the budget, you could even take out billboard ads, radio ads and even cable TV ads. How little or how much you spend on advertising and marketing your books is completely up to you.


 

5. You can publish at your pace

When you are an independent fiction author, you are not under contract with any publisher to produce X number of books within X years. You are also not subjected to the publisher’s publication schedule, which means you do not have to wait months or years for your book to hit the shelves, and if you can write more than one book a year, you can publish more than one book a year.

6. You are in complete control

When you independently publish, you are in complete control. You can publish as fast or slow as you want. You can hire or not hire professionals to help you. You can advertise or not advertise, according to your budget, and you can view your sales numbers immediately. In fact, being able to view your sales numbers immediately may be the biggest advantage. If you notice an increase or decrease in sales, you can make immediate marketing decisions based on those numbers because you’re not waiting for your publisher to give you your books sales numbers.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More from Stacey Carroll

 

AVIA2FUllCVerADAVIA ii: Bullets and Betrayal Kindle Edition

 

Greg Locke is the detective who thinks he can put away both Avia and Benton in the next book in the series Avia II Bullets and Betrayal. These two are very close to going to jail or going on vacation to Hawaii when their heist goes bad. They are stuck in a life of crime, and they cannot seem to get out. Thriller author Stacey Carroll tugs you through all the twists and turns of these two and their lives while showing you that crime can pay in the worst ways.

 

 

Read More on Editing

  1. What Is Over-Editing, and What Can You Do About It? ...
  2. 6 Tips for Performing Your Final Book Edit Before Formatting and Publication
  3.  HOW TO DEAL WITH 5 COMMON WRITER PROBLEMS
  4. Should I Hire an Editor for My Novel Before Submitting It to an Agent?
  5.  8 Tips on How to Quickly Self-Edit a Novel
  6. Extreme Fiction Manuscript Editing ...

 

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

I don’t talk too much about the time when I was submitting query letters, synopsis and sample chapters to agents. I don’t tend to look backwards. I’m not going in that direction. What I do is I keep my eyes focused ahead of me. That’s not to say I don’t learn from my past mistakes. I do. Then, I move forward with that knowledge and experience. I also weigh every decision very carefully. I weigh the pros and cons, and I make the best decision according to all the available information. Making the decision to query was no different. I weighed the pros and cons of self-pub against trad pub and decided the risk was worth it. If I got into trad pub, I would have the experience of agents, editors and publishers behind me, and I would be able to learn from them. I figured it was worth the few months to year to give it a shot. I send my first query letter on 12/11/2016. I sent my last query letter on 1/29/2018.

How Did I Start?

I said I submitted my first query letter on 12/11/2016, but I spent several weeks prior to that researching agents. I created a massive list. At first, it was just links stored in a bookmark folder. As I submitted to each agent, I put them in a spreadsheet. Later, I put the agents in the spreadsheet first and just moved down the list. I read everything there was to read on every agent. I made sure they took my genre. I made sure they didn’t exclude my theme and premise. I made sure there were no red flags in the agent profile. A few I paid particular attention too were where they got their clients published. If they were mostly agent-only publishers, I put them on the list. If they were mostly places I could submit to myself, I removed them from the list. I looked for phrases that indicated the agent may be burned out. I looked for crazy shit – Like don’t capitalize anything. Yes, I saw that in an agent profile. The agent wanted you to remove all the capitalization before submitting, including at the front of sentences! Once I had my list, I started submitting.

Why Did I Make That List?

I made the list because I had a strong suspicion that this was going to be a long, tedious process, and the odds that I would burn out before finding an agent were extremely high. I knew it would be a very discouraging process. It could potentially be a very long process, and if I had my list, I knew I would finish that list. I finish about 95% of everything I start, so if I had the list, there was a high probability that I wouldn’t stop until the list was done.

My Submission Process

I used Formatting and Submitting Your Manuscript to create my query letters, synopsis, outlines and other submission materials. I used a combination of The First Five Pages and Self-Editing for Fiction Writers to edit and finalize the manuscript. I started out with one of each query letter and long and short synopsis. By the end of it, I had 15 different query letters, four or five different synopsis and no outlines. I just wasn’t going to do it. Those outlines are tedious. I skipped any agent that wanted a chapter outline.

As I did my submissions, I re-researched the agents. I wanted to make sure that what I read initially was what was still on the page, and I wanted to make sure I hadn’t misread anything. I didn’t want to send anything to an agent that wouldn’t like or didn’t have publishing contacts in the areas where my fiction fit. I wanted to eliminate any potential wasted time and effort. I only wanted to send to agents that were extremely good fits for my work.

I did anywhere from 5 to 15 submissions a night, every night. There were very few nights that I skipped. I wanted to be as efficient as possible. When I got to agent 38, he asked for the full manuscript. Fantastic! So, I sent it. By this time, I also had quite a few rejection letters. This didn’t bother me. I had plenty more agents on the list, and I knew this was a very subjective process. Agent 38 got back to me after many months with a – Not for me thanks. No feedback. Nothing. Just that single sentence. Okay then. Fine.

The Water Heater

During that time period, however, my water heater broke. I was taking ice cold showers, and waiting on this agent to get back to me. Come on agent! Come on! Come on! Come on! We gotta get this process going! I need a new water heater! Hurry. Hurry. Hurry. I don’t know how much more of this I can take. Hurry. Hurry! Hurry!!!!!! And keep in mind that I knew that once this guy accepted the manuscript and sent me the contract that I was still looking at month and months and months of cold showers, but as long as this was moving forward, I would be okay.

I had a catastrophic nervous breakdown about 2 weeks after the water heater broke. Every shower was extremely painful. My whole body hurt. I ended up heating water all day, every day for my 1 evening bath. It was hell. I was in so much pain that I requested a credit increase. They gave me $100. I ordered a pizza, and that was the final straw. I spent two weeks recovering at my mom’s while my entire family scrounged $500 so I could get a new water heater.

Once the water heater was fixed and I got back home, I resumed the submission process. By agent 78, I was getting a little nervous. Something was wrong here. So, I took another objective look at the manuscript. The first 30 pages was chapters 1 and 2. I needed to get to chapter 3, so I edited and broke apart chapters and recapped them on both ends. I ended up increasing the word count from 77k to 85k. Well, crap. Okay, so everyone before agent 79 gets the old manuscript, and everyone 79 and higher gets the new manuscript. I don’t care which one they take. Even I know they are simply buying a concept, and the editor at the publishing house will want it 50 to 75% rewritten. That’s going to make me feel like a sellout, but whatever gets me there.

I also wrote new query letters and reformatted synopsis. Then, I submitted more faster. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Timeout. Timeout. Timeout. Timeout with no response.

You gotta be kidding me? Are any of these guys working? Are they reading anything? Are they so overwhelmed that they clicked the checkbox at the top of their email list and hit delete all? What’s going on here? This can’t possibly be normal. I’ve read every publishing story there is. I’ve never read anything like what I am experiencing. I’m past Stephen King’s rejections. I’m past J.K. Rowling’s rejections. I’m past that author that got 137 rejections. Just what in the living hell is going on here?

The Roof

In April, the roof started leaking by the fireplace. I paid a guy $40 plus the cost of roofing tar to tar it. I started getting roofing quotes. The cost was anywhere from $8,500 to $10,000. OMG. Okay. Well, shit. I can’t afford that. We’re going to hope that tar holds for a minute. I got 6 to 8 months before that tar washes away. Let’s hope something pans out. 

The Car

In August the brake lines on the car went out. I’m still getting rejections. I’m still crossing off agents due to timeouts. It’s $350 to fix the brake lines. That’s okay, but it’s another $300 to have the car towed. uh. It’s gotta wait. I can’t do it. I just gotta keep going. This is going to work out. Let me rewrite these query letters again. I need to redouble my efforts for these last few agents. THIS. WILL. WORK. OUT! No one is more determined than me. Surely they can see that. I will make it. I absolutely, positively will make this work. There is no other option but success.

Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. Rejection. 

Agent 350

OMFG. You’ve gotta be kidding me. This is ridiculous. I’m at something like agent 350. This is unreal. Are they working? Are they taking this seriously? Am I the only one taking this seriously? If I didn’t take my job seriously, I’d be homeless. You can’t run a business like this. You can’t decline all your potential clients. The rent doesn't get paid like this.

Yep, my business side started taking over. I’m a freelancer, and I’m thinking about business and profitability and income and expenses. This is not viable. You can’t run a business like this and expect to stay in business. In fact, I think I know why most agents don’t remain in business. I’m getting a very clear understanding of why the available agents change so dramatically. I’m starting to question the business model. I wonder if any of these guys have a business plan? Most of these websites also appear to be outdated.

The Business

I’m also getting increasingly concerned. I see a lot of agents asking for statistics. They want to know the author’s book marketing plan. They want to know the stats for the genre, sales, readers, market. How do they not know this? These should be numbers that they have memorized. The book market consists of 70% trad pub and 30% self-pub. Thriller is the largest book category by sales, dollar amount and advances. The average reader is female and between 35 and 45. Romance gives this all a good run for its money, and Erotica is also an amazingly large category with billions of dollars in sales every year. How do they not know this? What am I going to do if I get an agent that isn’t up-to-date on the industry? I don’t want to be the one teaching the potential agent! Yeah, I’m getting real concerned and a lot leery.

And for the agents asking for a book marketing plan… OMG. What? Do they not know this? Do they not have any ideas? Am I going to be developing my own book marketing plan without any professional help? Because seriously, this is kinda why I chose this path. I wanted the expert experience, and I wanted to learn while avoiding a few of the common mistakes. I wanted the best chance for success, and I find myself poking lots and lots of holes in this. The more I dig, the less impressed I am.

Finishing the List

On 1/29/2018, I finished my list. This was hard. By this time, I’ve objectively evaluated everything. I’m not getting anywhere, and I think I had that last agent on my list unsubmitted to for a week. I’m not convinced trad pub is the way to go. I’m really concerned about the business model. I’m concerned about the work ethic. I’m concerned about the timeliness, but I can’t leave anything undone. I did submit to that last agent. But at this time, I’m also doing the math. 

It’s now been about a year and a half since I started this process. The average advance is $10,000. After the agent takes a cut and the author pays taxes, you walk away with about $5,000 to $6,000 dollars. The editing process can take another six months, and the publisher may not put the book on the publishing schedule for another 12 months, so I’m looking at another 18 months at a min. That’s 3 years. $6,000. That’s $166 a month roughly. Hmmmm. You know, I’m not impressed with that, and I’m also starting to hear horror stories about authors not liking the covers and finding typos and other things inside the books that are unsatisfactory, and the publisher is refusing to make changes. I’m also hearing horror stories about books being published and left to rot with no marketing money from the publisher. No marketing plan from the publisher.  I'm also a huge beleiver in Murphy's Law.  If it can go wrong, it will go wrong, and I can very easily see all of this and more happening to me.  Not to mention, if this submission process is any indication, this is not going to go well or smoothly.  I have a feeling that this is going to be like climbing a cliff with no ropes or safety gear while being completely naked and trying to avoid cuts from the rocks.  While I don't mind a good struggle, I need to realize that this has gotten extreme.  I don't know that I have a big enough sledgehammer to break through this wall.  Lord knows, I've already pulled out the 50 pounder.  Thankfully, I knew there was another option.  I didn't have to keep banging my head against this wall.  I could take back control.  I just needed to make the decision.

That was when I decided to timeout and so self-pub. Increasingly, I was hearing stories about not having control over the book. Not being able to make changes, unsatisfactory marketing. And I realized that if I have to do everything myself, I might as well take full control of my work and self-publish. And that’s exactly what I did. I let all those submissions timeout, and 24 hours after the last timeout, I self-published.

I do want to make it clear that at no point did I doubt myself or my writing ability.  I never doubted the viability of my books.  I know a lot of authors succumb to self-doubt the minute they start getting rejection letters.  I never took those rejection letters personally.  They made me mad.  Every rejetion felt like wasted effort and time, but I never really doubted myself.  I know I can write.  I know my stories are good, and if you are inthe middle of this submission process, just remember that.  You are a good writer.  Your story is fine.

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

 When it comes to being effective on social media, Direct Messages (DMs) can help spread your message and garner you new clients if done correctly. Unfortunately, if their done incorrectly, you could be making yourself look like email spam. Thankfully, there are some things you can do to make your DMs more effectively to ensure they are read instead of ignored and deleted immediately.

1. Never Ever Under Any Circumstances Automate Your DMs

Under no circumstances should you automate your DMs. Direct Message automation is when you setup a direct message to send if a certain action is triggered. When I see DMs, they are typically triggered by a “follow” of an account, but they can be set to send under other circumstances. I’m going to be quite blunt here. These DMs are spam. They’re sent about 30 to 60 seconds after the follow, and they usually contain irrelevant information, like a sales pitch or an offer of proving for-hire services or selling a product. No one wants to see an automated DM. Not Ever. It’s even worse if you send an automated DM using a free service, because you know what’s at the bottom of that DM? Sent by X service. That’s right. No matter how well you write that DM, you’re free service will out your automated DM.  If you want to be taken seriously as a professional, do not ever send these.

2. Never Send an Unsolicited Link

Under no circumstances should you ever send any sort of unsolicited link. This is a link to a website that you sent in a DM that was not requested. It doesn’t matter how legitimate or well known you are, anyone who has half a brain won’t click on that. There’s too much of a risk for grabbing viruses and maleware for anyone to click on any link. Furthermore, doing this will probably get you blocked immediately by the receiver, which completely destroys whatever you were trying to do.  If you are going to link to things, you would be better off putting those in your Twitter, Instagram or Facebook feeds, not in someone's Direct Message box.

3. Stop and Think About Your Message

Before you type your message, think about it. What are you going to send as your first message? Is it attention grabbing? If your first thought is to type “Hi” or “How are you?” STOP! There is no need to see if someone is awake or to start an online conversation with small talk. No one has time for that. It is most important to start the conversation, not waste someone’s time looking at a message that simply says – HI. What are they supposed to do with that? The individual has no idea what you want, or if what you want is even relevant. Not to mention, no one wants to spend 10 minutes in small talk trying to figure out what you need. Just state it.

4. Determine if Your Message is Relevant

Now that you’ve thought about your direct message and you know what you want to say, determine if your message is relevant. When I say relevant, I mean relevant to the individual who will be receiving your message. Do you need help that the individual can provide? Do you need their services? Did you see something in their feed and want to ask a question that isn’t appropriate for comments? Did you buy a product or service and need to talk to the individual about it? If you answered yes to any of this or your DM falls under anything smiliar, your message is relevant. If your sole purpose is to sell your goods or services or chat, your social media feed is the best place to put those posts.

By following these DM social media rules, you’ll be more likely to receive a response and start a professional relationship.

 

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Do you need content for your website? There are thousands of freelance writers that can write well-researched, detailed blog posts, articles and webpages for a variety of business, including HVAC, chiropractic care, plumbing, home remodeling and human and pet dental care, and many of them have years, if not decades, of experience. The caveat is that they need to know what you want in order to write the content you desire. These means that you’ll have to provide a few details.

1. Your Topic or Article Title

The most important piece of information is your topic or article title. This can be as vague or specific as you want, but most freelancers can write an article with as little as – Top 10 Reasons to Replace Your Furnace or Chiropractic Treatments for Sciatica. A professional freelance writer in Indianapolis will search that title or topic and review all the available information. Then, they will craft your article with the information that they found.

2. The Business Website

In order to ensure the content writer doesn’t include services your business doesn’t provide, it’s a good idea to provide the link to the current business website, no matter how vague. Your freelance writer will review that website, looking for specific information, including your business name, location, phone number and current services. This helps the freelancer fill out the article with your geolocation, provide an accurate call to action and make sure that services you don’t offer are not listed in the article. If there is no business website, you can provide this information by typing it into the text box. What the freelancer isn’t going to do is call or email you or the business or drop by unless it’s requested. Instead, all that information is simply used for informational purposes.

3. Any Specific Items You Want Mentioned

If there is something specific that you want mentioned in the article, webpage or blog, it’s a good idea to mention it. While your freelance writer may stumble upon it by accident, it’s always best to make sure they include it by listing it in your directions.

4. Any Keywords that You Know You Want

If you’ve hired a content strategist or an SEO expert to research particular keywords, it’s best to include those keywords in your directions so that your content writer can include them. Content writers tend to include certain keywords automatically, like the city and state where you are located, your industry and the specific services you offer or the service that is highlighted in the article. For example, if your article is on Chiropractic Care for Back Pain, there’s no need to request chiropractic care or back pain as keywords. They will appear automatically as those are part of the topic and vital to the article. Just remember not to add so many keywords that the article appears stuffed.

5. Any Additional Specifics

If there are other specifics you need to add, like an article outline, specific formatting or additional details about the business and its service, remember to mention them in your directions. This is especially helpful if the requested article doesn’t necessarily mesh with the business. For example, if you own an HVAC business but the article is about home remodeling. In this instance, you will want the writer to talk primarily about home remodeling, but include a section on the importance of updating or upgrading the HVAC so that it can handle the additional load caused by the extra space.

By providing your freelancer with a few details about your content and what you expect, you will be more likely to get content that you love and can immediately use on your website. Just remember not to alienate your writer with Items to Never Include in Your Custom Content Directions.

 

Read More on Freelancing

 

  1. 4 Benefits of Using Dual Monitors While Writing and Freelancing ...
  2. Introductory Printers for Freelancing and Manuscript Printing That Will Meet Your Needs ...
  3. What should a Content Article Contain?
  4. What’s the Difference Between Custom Content and Content on Demand?
  5. How to Write a Content Article, Blog Post or Webpage with No Directions

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Congratulations, you’ve made the decision to hire a freelance writer to handle your website content needs. Keeping your content up-to-date and adding new content on a regular basis can help you rank for your preferred keywords and help you attain a high page rank in Google, Yahoo, Bing, DuckDuckGo and other search engines. However, there are a few things you should never include in your article directions.

1. You Understand that I Can Post This Under My Name…

Freelance writers sell full rights unless otherwise stated. This means that once you purchase the content, it is yours to do with as you see fit. You can edit it, add your name as the creator and spin it. The content is entirely yours and the freelance writer does not retain any rights after payment has been made.

2. Must Be Grammatically Correct

Freelance writers understand this and would never knowingly hand you content that is grammatically incorrect. The best case scenario here is that your freelance writer realizes that you may have had one or more bad experiences on extremely cheap content sites where you got a new or inexperienced writer that handed you a few pieces of content with subject/verb disagreements or that you are new to the world of content creation. The worst case scenario is that your freelance writer thinks you may be a nitpicky asshole. If the latter is suspected, your freelancer has two choices. They can politely decline your content or triple their rates in anticipation of many many time-consuming revision requests.

3. I Will Reject the Content IF…

No matter how you finish this sentence, it’s a bad thing. If you are already thinking about rejecting the content your writer is about to create for you, you’re in the wrong mindset. Clients typically use this phrasing when they are extremely frustrated and have been handed numerous pieces of content that needed extreme editing or were completely unusable. These types of scenarios typically happen on very cheap content sites where you are paying less than a penny a word. While that makes the content extremely affordable, it doesn’t allow your content writer to spend much time on your content.

 

At 500 words at .01 cents a word, your writer is getting paid $5 at most. You’ll be lucky if your writer spent 10 minutes on your content. This means that it doesn’t get researched. It doesn’t get spell checked. They’re not going to run it through Grammarly. You may get a plagiarism check by the content site, but that’s all you’re going to get, and the reason is simple. Your article was one of 20 that the writer had to complete that day in order to meet their financial quota, and they won’t have time to complete any revisions. Instead, they’ll throw your article back in the queue and keep moving forward on other pieces that may be accepted on sight.

4. I Hated My Last Writer(s)

If you hated your last writer or writers, there’s a good chance you’re going to hate your next writer. There are a couple reasons for this. The first reason is that you went to an extremely cheap content site. Content sites that only pay their writers a penny or less per word tend to attract new writers. While these sites are a great way for new freelancers to gain experience, they also often result in content that needs heavily edited, which can result spending more time on the content than you would have liked. If you don’t mind this, by all means, give a new freelancer a shot. They really do need to buildup their skills. If doing this resulted in hating the writer, I’d recommend paying a little more for a more experienced freelancer.

The second reason is that you have extreme requirements or unrealistic expectations. Content writers are not mind-readers. They’re going to strive to give you high-quality content that is SEO optimized for your industry and business location. If your directions have a lot of details, there’s a good chance your writer is going to miss one of those details, and it won’t be on purpose. As I said, most freelancers will do their best to hand you an article you can immediately post to your website.

5. Your Directions Are Longer than the Piece of Content

If you need a 500 word article, and you have three Google documents, a detailed outline, a list of Do’s and Don’t’s and formatting requirements, you’re going to have a hard time finding a writer. The only writers that take these pieces of content are the ones writing content at $1 to $2 a word. That’s $500 to $1,000 per blog post or content article. This is because it may take your writer a day to go through all of your requirements before they can even begin writing it. Then, it may take another day to write and check the content against your requirements and directions. That’s a lot of time to spend on one article, and most content writers can’t afford to do that for $50 or even $150.

6. You Used Expletives in Your Directions

I’ve seen content order directions with expletives, and I move right along to the next order when I see it. The best case scenario is that your freelancer simply thinks you are unprofessional. The worst case scenario is that your writer thinks you are a nasty son-of-a-bitch that is going to make any type of working relationship a living nightmare. Most freelancers are going to avoid writing anything that has expletives in the directions. Any writer you might get is going to be desperate for the money, so much so that they are willing to take a chance on what might be a very bad client.

7. Your Timeframe Is Unrealistic

Unrealistic timeframes are another reason freelancers pass on writing certain pieces of content. Most freelancers I know can’t get to a piece of content within 24 hours. Their schedules are already full for at least the next day and possibly the next two days. For this reason, all content should have a minimum of 48 and 72 hours for the completion deadline. After that, 24 hours should be added for every additional 500 words after the first 500. This means that if you have a 1,500-word article, you should give the writer between 96 and 120 hours or four to five days. Timeframes that are shorter than that usually require a rush fee due to the freelancer having to move other clients articles further into the week or to cram more content into a day than they would really prefer due to the risk of brain fry or churning out content that may have unintentional errors.

8. You Used Obnoxious Colors in Your Directions

Directions for content articles should be colored black. If you have something that you want to make sure your writer doesn’t miss, you can bold it. What you shouldn’t do is highlight it in yellow, red or any other color or change the color of the text. This can make you appear rude and/or render the text unreadable. If you really feel like you must use a different color to highlight very important areas of your directions, I would suggest using dark blue or dark green, but again, I caution against changing the text color to any other color other than black.

9. I Can’t Wait to See Your First Draft

Professional freelance writers don’t submit drafts as a general rule. What you receive when the writer submits your content is a complete article, webpage or blog post that you are free to use immediately upon rendering payment. Submitting an obvious draft version is considered a waste of your time and the writer’s time. The exception to this is if the content is extremely technical or niche. The writer may want you to look at it to make sure they are on the right track and to avoid any unnecessary revisions or the need for a complete article rewrite, which can result in delays.

10. Must Not Contain Any Fluff

What’s your definition of fluff? The term Fluff varies greatly between writers and clients. Some clients consider fluff to be connecting words and words that are meant to improve the flow and readability of the content. Writers tend to consider fluff to be large sections that are off-topic or contain a lot of internal monologue type content, but this depends on the tone of your blog or website. If every blog on your site contains a section about your day or your random thoughts before getting to the topic, your writer is going to emulate that, but most of us consider that fluff.

11. Must Be Perfect

This is code for nitpicky and unrealistic expectations. Every freelancer wants you to have the best possible content for your website, and they want the content to be immediately usable and useful. Freelancers, however, are not perfect. That’s part of the human condition. We strive for perfection, but we are not perfect. If you know you are going to get upset over a typo, or that your freelancer doesn’t have telepathic abilities, you might be better off writing that content yourself and saving yourself some money in the process.

If you avoid doing these things in your content directions, you will be much more likely to have your order accepted by the freelance writer and get that content in a timely manner. Not to mention, you’ll start off on a professional footing and be more likely to work with each other in the future.

Write comment (0 Comments)

 

 

If you’ve been around the Internet lately, you’ve probably noticed an increase in sites that want to know your location, show you a pop-up when you are about to browse away from the site and demand that you sign up for their email list. StaceyCarroll.org uses none of that shit, and there’s a reason. It’s fucking annoying, and the last thing I want to do is annoy my visitors. I love my visitors, and I hope they find valuable information here, but I want them to come back because they want to come back. Not to mention, every browser has a bookmark bar. If you love the site, you’ll bookmark it.

Popups

I hate popups. When I visits a website, I am solely looking for information. I’m not looking for whatever is being advertised in that pop-up, and begging me to stay is just going to annoy me. In other words, whatever website I visited, I did so for a specific purpose – usually to learn something. I assume you’re the same way, and when you come here, you want the information as fast as possible. Pop-ups delay your ability to see the information you want to see and force you to perform an additional step before you can see that information. For those reasons, pop-ups aren’t used here, minus the stupid cookies notification which is actually required these days. I hate that one too, but there’s nothing I can do about that one. It has to be here.

Notifications

How many notifications do you get on your phone each day? I get anywhere from 50 to 100. I don’t need any more and I’m guessing you don’t either. Therefore, my site isn’t going to force you to get notifications, and I don’t need to force your location. In fact, none of that is going to make this website function any more efficiently. The content is the content, and the site speed is the site speed.

Email Lists

I don’t need another email notifying me of anything. I get so much spam email from websites that force joining the email list when I sign-up that I’m overflowing with them. In fact, I need to flag a bunch as spam because I’m tired of looking at them. They’re junking up my inbox, and none of them are specifically for me. I assume you are the same way. If the email isn’t specifically for you, you don’t want it. Also, even if I set up emails to solely show you new content, you’d get spammed out of your own inboxes. I update this site multiple times a week and sometimes multiple times a day. Not to mention, I have new posts fed to all my social media accounts. If you’re here, you probably came here from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, MeWe or Tumbler.

Google Ads

Bonus: This site doesn’t use Google ads, and there’s a reason. In the 15 years I’ve been using Google ads, I’ve earned a whopping $6.50. That comes out to .001217 cents per day. If I continued to use Google ads, I can expect a payout in another 82,169 days or 225 years from now. Unless they come up with an immortality pill or I run into a vampire, I won’t be around in 225 years. Not to mention, it’s very difficult to control Google ads. Every time I’ve used them, the site gets inundated with Grammarly and University ads. I know I don’t give a shit about either of those, and I assume you don’t either. What I do use are ads that allow me to choose the specific ad or adset, like Amazon Affiliates or Rakads. That way I control what’s on the site, and since this site is specifically geared toward books, authors and writers, all I want on this site is writing related ads and books.

 

 

Read More from Stacey Carroll

 

AVIA1BookadfullcoverThunderstorms and .45s: 2018 Avia Version Kindle Edition

 

Avia might be able to con a rich woman out of 50 million dollars before her vacation to Hawaii, but she's going to need some help to do it. She has to call in people she terms her "cousins," and she has to deal with the fact that she is still an alcoholic and heroin addict. With the help of Benton, can Avia actually pull off this heist and get out of town before it is too late?

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BKS6VZQ

 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Are you tired of all the social media hubbub? Do you hate interacting with your Twitter followers? Are you seeking new ways to totally piss off your Twitter followers so you have an excuse to interact less? If you answered yes to these questions, then you need my 5 step guide to totally pissing off all your Twitter followers to the point where they unfollow and block you!

1. Be a Follow for an Unfollow Account

In the past, the recommendation was to follow a bunch of people and after a certain number of days, unfollow everyone. The thinking is that this makes you look special. I mean, if you’ve only followed 25 people and you have 15,000 followers, you have such awesome content that people can’t bare to unfollow you, even if you don’t reciprocate or participate with your follows. People are getting wise to this, and there are numerous programs that allow Twitter users to see who unfollowed them and who isn’t following them. Some Twitter users even utilize programs that follow and unfollow automatically, according to certain triggers. For example, if a new person follows the account, the program automatically follows that account back. It does the reverse for unfollows. The reason for this is that Twitter’s algorithm has gotten stricter, specially for accounts that have more than 5,000 followers. You can only have about a 10% difference between your followers and following lists in order to follow more people. This has caused an increasing number of twitter accounts to regularly check for unfollowers. Not to mention, you’re not being special. You’re being an asshole.

2. Send Stupid DMs or Worse – AUTO-DMs

When you think about engaging your followers, you probably think DMs are the way to do it. After all , getting a personalized message from a new or existing followers is pretty darn cool. Unfortunately, it’s only pretty darn cool if the message is RELEVANT! If it’s not relevant, you are spamming people’s phones and pissing people off. The best case scenario is that your message is simply ignored, but the person you sent it to could decide to immediately unfollow you, and in some cases, block you, which means you haven’t accomplished anything productive. So, for your own social media standing, do not send auto-DMs to thank new followers, promote your services or items, and for fuck’s sake, do NOT send HELLO DMs. If you are going to send a Direct Message, make sure that message is RELEVANT. For example, if you are talking to an author, make sure you have a relevant question. If you want to interact with a business, make sure your DM is about a product or service related to that business. If you just want to babble, post a comment.

3. Post Nothing but Promotion Content

The days of – buy my shit – advertising are over. While a few promotional posts about products, services and wares are appropriate, it should not make up the majority of your Twitter feed. No one wants to scroll your personal feed and see 200 buy my shit posts, which means you better have something else in your feed along with your promotion content. Thankfully, it can be anything, including what you ate for breakfast and random comments, but the goal here is to look like a real person instead of a digital entity. If you want to take it a step further, post or retweet someone else’s content, just don’t retweet too often. People still want to ‘hear’ your voice.

4. Never Interact with Your Twitter Followers

If you want to be unknown, feel free to never interact with your Twitter followers. The whole point of social media is to engage and communicate. If people post comments to your feed and you never say anything, you’re not helping your standing. In fact, your followers may feel ignored and unfollow you. The best case scenario is that you simply don’t get many if any comments. Now, for accounts with thousands of followers, you may feel slightly overwhelmed, but there’s a way to manage this. You’ll have to turn on comments for everyone, and you really should pick a time once a day to go into Twitter and comment on other people’s posts. Scroll your feed for 10 minutes and comment on whatever looks good. You’ll be helping your followers and yourself in the short and long-term.

5. Set Your Scheduled Tweets to Post Every 60 Seconds

I’m looking at you Fox News and anyone else who thinks this is a good idea. If you schedule your tweets to post every 60 seconds or less, you will very quickly drown out everyone else on all your followers lists. This is going to do nothing but piss people off. I actually had Fox news on my following list for about two weeks. Every single post I saw was Fox news. This was because they were literally tweeting every 15 to 30 seconds. That doesn't make an account relevant. That makes it spam. Just fry up some eggs and slap some ketchup on that. Instead, make sure you have some kind of gap between your posts. Let other people talk.

Write comment (5 Comments)

 

Writing and Editing Books on Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coffee Mugs for Writers on Amazon

 

 

Journals for Writers on Amazon

 

 

    

  

 

 



 

Tablets for Writers on Amazon